OOMBRA ARCHITECTS
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112 EDMUND PLACE

PROJECT: 112 EDMUND PLACE
DEVELOPER: ROBERTSON HOMES & TERRANOVUS DEVELOPMENT
LOCATION: BRUSH PARK - DETROIT, MI
STATUS: ONGOING

112 Edmund is a five story mixed-use retail and residential building situated on the John R commercial corridor alongside historic mansions in the Brush Park Neighborhood of Detroit. This development looks to bring density and activity back to a once activated city corner in a quickly changing and historically rich neighborhood.  

EAST ELEVATION - OOMBRA ARCHITECTS ©

AERIAL HISTORY - OOMBRA ARCHITECTS ©

URBAN FABRIC REPAIR Detroit’s population peaked at 1.85 million in 1950. A 2015 U.S. Census notes that number to be about 680,000. Some of the contributing factors to the decline was an over-reliance upon a single industry, the rise of the suburbs, racism in housing, the 1950s and 1960s construction of I-75 and I-375 freeways, and the Riots. Parts of Detroit are so abandoned they have been described as looking like farmland, urban prairie, and even complete wilderness. Three years after the City emerged from the largest declared bankrupcy in municipal history, signs point to a resurgence. When city services and amenities have been ravaged what kind of project can thrive?

JOHN R STREET VIEW LOOKING SOUTH - OOMBRA ARCHITECTS ©

JOHN R STREET VIEW LOOKING SOUTH - OOMBRA ARCHITECTS ©

JOHN R STREET VIEW LOOKING SOUTH - OOMBRA ARCHITECTS ©

A horizontal brick clad podium subtly separates program uses as it folds back from the street and stitches together an historic material and texture palette re-imagined in a contemporary way allowing elements of continuity throughout the design. The mass of the building holds together as one object that is thoughtfully molded to give deference to adjacent context and maintain a visual connection between the pedestrian and the neighboring Lucien Moore home . A regular, repeating window pattern is balanced by a dynamic facade that pulls inward to allow for a level 2 residential terrace. A green roof and amenity deck give solar relief to the building and offset the flow of water entering the city’s storm sewer system, reducing water runoff through transpiration.